Academic Offerings

The Italy Center offers courses on a rotating basis each year. Below you will find the courses listed by semester linked to their full course descriptions. Please note the following items when considering your course schedule (applicable to semester programs only):

  • All courses are three (3) credits unless otherwise noted
  • 12-15 total credit hours per semester (any more must be approved by the Director)
  • Minimum three (3) credits of Italian
  • HUM 295 and 490 are permission only and have separate applications (see each course for details)

Download the IC Academic Curriculum as a PDF (updated document available soon)

 


 

Fall Semester (beginning Fall 2018)

 

Art History 299: Northern Art in the Renaissance Period

ARH 299 Syllabus

Throughout the centuries, due to its central position, Bologna has always been a place where foreigners stopped during their travels contributing to the spread of new ideas. The University itself, with its importance and antiquity, encouraged the cultural development of the town. In particular the Sack of Rome in 1527, the coronation of Charles V in 1530, the 1547 spring session of the Council of Trent held in Bologna, are all important events which modified the artistic and cultural climate of the town. This course analyzes the lively atmosphere present in Bologna and Northern Italy in that period. Many lessons will be held in churches, palaces or museums in order to better understand the context of the various works of art (approximate costs of entrance fees will be $70).

Art / Communications 253: Introduction to Digital Video Production & Human Rights

ART/CMM 253 Syllabus

This program combines classroom instruction and video production work with work in the Bologna community. Students, with faculty members serving as supervisors, are placed at a local immigrant association and are asked to produce a short web documentary based on the needs of the community. Students will work in teams to find, shape, and tell stories about the lives of recent immigrants. In addition, students will be required to attend film screenings at the Bologna Human Rights Nights International Film Festival and to meet with international filmmakers.

Business / Philosophy (300+): Environment, Business, & Ethics (pending)

Syllabus

Description

Communications / Art 253: Introduction to Digital Video Production & Human Rights

ART/CMM 253 Syllabus

This program combines classroom instruction and video production work with work in the Bologna community. Students, with faculty members serving as supervisors, are placed at a local immigrant association and are asked to produce a short web documentary based on the needs of the community. Students will work in teams to find, shape, and tell stories about the lives of recent immigrants. In addition, students will be required to attend film screenings at the Bologna Human Rights Nights International Film Festival and to meet with international filmmakers.

English 295: Literature–Mediterranean Place, Race, & Language

ENG 295 Syllabus

This course will focus on literary texts that deal with travel/displacement and issues of conflict, difference and alienation while engaging in a new place, culture, and language. The novellas, poems, novels and short stories, written between the high middle ages and the end of the last century, from primarily Italy, but also England and the United States, will mirror and help students to make sense of some of the things that they are experiencing this semester as they travel throughout Italy, the Balkans and Western Europe.

History / Political Science 315: Understanding the Mediterranean

HIS/POL 315 Syllabus

The Mediterranean as a category has increasingly gained rhetorical currency in historical and political debates. It is often presented as the floodgate through which trickle organized crime, political corruption, illegal immigration, financial crisis, and more generally, the malaise of globalization. This approach calls, however, for an alternative analysis, centered upon the importance of this region in its historical developments, as well as its current strategic and geopolitical dimension.
The first half of the course begins by defining the Mediterranean as a region in and of itself, to contrast the framing of Mediterranean versus that of MENA and Europe through geographical and historical lenses. Decolonization of the region will then be discussed from both a historical and a political perspective. Extra focus will be provided on the Italian context, examining Italian colonialism in the Fascist era, its logic and its effects, visible even today. The second half of the course explores different recent debates concerning the Mediterranean region, focusing upon the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the economic crisis, the Arab Spring, the role of religion and institutions, as well as the process of democratization currently underway in many Mediterranean countries.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the history, politics and identities of the Mediterranean, thereby enhancing and enriching their academic experience at SHC Italy Center.

History 322: Europe Since 1945

HIST 322 Syllabus

Emphasis is on the postwar period, the Cold War, politics, the process of decolonization, the European Union, the changes in Eastern Europe, and contemporary developments.

Humanities 295: Directed Undergraduate Research

HUM 295 Syllabus

The Spring Hill College Italy Center Director will work with a student and his home campus adviser in order to assist in the design of an academic research project. The project goals and objectives are to be agreed upon by the student with his/her home campus professor. The Italy Center will assist in aligning the student with community resources to include a faculty advisor. Examples of undergraduate research projects include a study of sibling relationships in a Bologna Rom (gypsy) camp and Italian language acquisition among immigrant North African children in comparison to their parent’s language abilities. Independent studies will be approved solely for students who exhibit a prior track record of academic excellence and an ability to work independently.

Humanities 490: Social Justice Internship

HUM 490 Syllabus

Professional experience through a semester of directed part-time internship at a local cultural, business, or not for profit Bologna agency. Enrollment is restricted and will require a two month advance correspondence with the Spring Hill College Italy Center Internship Coordinator. Students are expected to work a minimum of ten hours per week in a community agency. Placements are available in both the English and Italian languages.

Italian 101 & 102: Elementary Italian

ITA 101 Syllabus            ITA 102 Syllabus

 The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the Italian language. This is an intensive course that combines a normal semester’s worth of material into a five week session. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions and grammar sufficient to support these. Through in-class activities and homework assignments, students can expect to learn about modern Italy, including geography, culture, history, and society. The fact that Spring Hill students reside in the Collegio Alma Mater Residence Hall offers a rich language immersion opportunity to practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. A few Friday’s sessions will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets and galleries of Bologna.

Italian 201: Intermediate Italian

ITA 201 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to advance students in the Italian language. Aspects of teaching will entail: reading, analysis and class discussion of texts (articles, songs, short stories), oral presentations, based on research on the newspapers, writing homework assignments (compositions, essays, journal). This course is entirely conducted in Italian. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions and grammar sufficient to support these. The fact that Spring Hill students reside in the Collegio Alma Mater Residence Hall offers a rich language immersion opportunity to practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. Certain Fridays will have a tutoring component where one will assist lower level students of Italian while participating in cultural trips, allowing one to practice his/her language skills while being exposed to some of the hidden treasures, markets and galleries of Bologna. Intermediate students will also be asked to participate in a speaking partner program with Italian students from the University of Bologna.

Italian 381: Advanced Italian

ITA 381 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the complexity of the Italian language. Aspects of teaching will entail: reading, analysis and class discussion of texts (articles, songs, short stories), oral presentations, based on research on the newspapers, writing homework assignments (compositions, essays, journal). This course is entirely conducted in Italian. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions and grammar sufficient to support these. The fact that Spring Hill students reside in the Collegio Alma Mater Residence Hall offers a rich language immersion opportunity to practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. Certain Fridays will have a tutoring component where one will assist lower level students of Italian while participating in cultural trips, allowing one to practice his/her language skills while being exposed to some of the hidden treasures, markets and galleries of Bologna. Advanced students will also be asked to participate in a speaking partner program with Italian students from the University of Bologna.

Philosophy 214: Environmental Ethics

PHL 214 Syllabus

The course will examine the philosophical issues of environmental ethics and the following questions: The competing paradigms of environmental science; historical roots of the environmental predicament, animal rights, and the idea of a sustainable society. The semester begins with studying the “myths” of origin of humanity in ancient Greece (Prometheus) and in the biblical tradition (Genesis). Chronologically the material will proceed arriving at a late semester review of contemporary authors. The closing sessions will address recent developments with regards to its implications on the future of human nature.

Philosophy / Business (300+): Environment, Business, & Ethics (pending)

Syllabus

Description

Political Science / History 315: Understanding the Mediterranean

HIS/POL 315 Syllabus

The Mediterranean as a category has increasingly gained rhetorical currency in historical and political debates. It is often presented as the floodgate through which trickle organized crime, political corruption, illegal immigration, financial crisis, and more generally, the malaise of globalization. This approach calls, however, for an alternative analysis, centered upon the importance of this region in its historical developments, as well as its current strategic and geopolitical dimension.
The first half of the course begins by defining the Mediterranean as a region in and of itself, to contrast the framing of Mediterranean versus that of MENA and Europe through geographical and historical lenses. Decolonization of the region will then be discussed from both a historical and a political perspective. Extra focus will be provided on the Italian context, examining Italian colonialism in the Fascist era, its logic and its effects, visible even today. The second half of the course explores different recent debates concerning the Mediterranean region, focusing upon the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the economic crisis, the Arab Spring, the role of religion and institutions, as well as the process of democratization currently underway in many Mediterranean countries.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the history, politics and identities of the Mediterranean, thereby enhancing and enriching their academic experience at SHC Italy Center.

Political Science 375: Terrorism, Revolution & War

POL 375 Syllabus

A central theme in this course is to try to figure out the extent to which wars are the purposeful, rational pursuit of policy or the result of seemingly inexorably forces over which there is little control. The course will culminated with a tour to North Africa and will provide students with a firsthand account of the Tunisian Jasmine Revolution that took place in the Spring of 2011.

Social Science 295: Human Rights & Global Change

SSC 295 Syllabus

Community Based Research and Service –A survey course on international human rights and an analysis of how the Italian government is working (or not working) to protect them. The course attracts community leaders, immigrants and activists to lecture on human rights and their place within the Italian and global systems. Students working in teams will be placed in local community associations and will be introduced to the methods and principles of community based research. Students are expected to spend a minimum of 24 hours serving in a community agency.

Theology 261: World Religions

THL 261 Syllabus

A study of religious faith as a central fact of history and world culture through a reflective interpretation of major historical and theological documents. The survey course is anchored in the literature of Christianity, Islam and Judaism.

 


 

Spring Semester

 

Art History 311: Renaissance to Modern Art

ARH 311 Syllabus

A survey of the major visual art forms of Western civilization from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. The course will include fees for Museums entrances which will be a required component of the class (approximate costs of entrance fees will be $70).

Art/Communications 253: Introduction to Digital Video Production & Human Rights

ART/CMM 253 Syllabus

This program combines classroom instruction and video production work with work in the Bologna community. Students, with faculty members serving as supervisors, are placed at a local immigrant association and are asked to produce a short web documentary based on the needs of the community. Students will work in teams to find, shape, and tell stories about the lives of recent immigrants. In addition, students will be required to attend film screenings at the Bologna Human Rights Nights International Film Festival and to meet with international filmmakers.

Business 320: International Business

BUS 320 Syllabus

An overview of business in an international environment, incorporating economic, management, marketing, and financial implications of international transactions. Topics include exchange rates, trade policy, international institutions, global theory, and cultural aspects of business. This course will place a particular emphasis on the role of Italy and Europe in the global marketplace.

Communications / Art 253: Introduction to Digital Video Production & Human Rights

ART/CMM 253 Syllabus

This program combines classroom instruction and video production work with work in the Bologna community. Students, with faculty members serving as supervisors, are placed at a local immigrant association and are asked to produce a short web documentary based on the needs of the community. Students will work in teams to find, shape, and tell stories about the lives of recent immigrants. In addition, students will be required to attend film screenings at the Bologna Human Rights Nights International Film Festival and to meet with international filmmakers.

English 321: Italian Literature–Dante in English

ENG 321 Syllabus

An introduction to Dante’s major literary works, La Vita Nuova (The New Life) and the Divine Comedy. Close readings of the text will seek to give students an appreciation of Dante’s place in world literature. Dante’s masterpieces will also be discussed in a historical and philosophical perspective, and supplementary readings will acquaint the reader with the medieval view of life and literature.

History / Political Science 315: Understanding the Mediterranean

HIS/POL 315 Syllabus

The Mediterranean as a category has increasingly gained rhetorical currency in historical and political debates. It is often presented as the floodgate through which trickle organized crime, political corruption, illegal immigration, financial crisis, and more generally, the malaise of globalization. This approach calls, however, for an alternative analysis, centered upon the importance of this region in its historical developments, as well as its current strategic and geopolitical dimension.
The first half of the course begins by defining the Mediterranean as a region in and of itself, to contrast the framing of Mediterranean versus that of MENA and Europe through geographical and historical lenses. Decolonization of the region will then be discussed from both a historical and a political perspective. Extra focus will be provided on the Italian context, examining Italian colonialism in the Fascist era, its logic and its effects, visible even today. The second half of the course explores different recent debates concerning the Mediterranean region, focusing upon the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the economic crisis, the Arab Spring, the role of religion and institutions, as well as the process of democratization currently underway in many Mediterranean countries.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the history, politics and identities of the Mediterranean, thereby enhancing and enriching their academic experience at SHC Italy Center.

Humanities 295: Directed Undergraduate Research

HUM 295 Syllabus

The Spring Hill College Italy Center Director will work with a student and his home campus adviser in order to assist in the design of an academic research project. The project goals and objectives are to be agreed upon by the student with his/her home campus professor. The Italy Center will assist in aligning the student with community resources to include a faculty advisor. Examples of undergraduate research projects include a study of sibling relationships in a Bologna Rom (gypsy) camp and Italian language acquisition among immigrant North African children in comparison to their parent’s language abilities. Independent studies will be approved solely for students who exhibit a prior track record of academic excellence and an ability to work independently.

Humanities 490: Social Justice Internship

HUM 490 Syllabus

Professional experience through a semester of directed part-time internship at a local cultural, business, or not for profit Bologna agency. Enrollment is restricted and will require a two month advance correspondence with the Spring Hill College Italy Center Internship Coordinator. Students are expected to work a minimum of ten hours per week in a community agency. Placements are available in both the English and Italian languages.

Italian 101 & 102: Elementary Italian

ITA 101 Syllabus            ITA 102 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the Italian language. This is an intensive course that combines a normal semester’s worth of material into a five week session. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions and grammar sufficient to support these. Through in-class activities and homework assignments, students can expect to learn about modern Italy, including geography, culture, history, and society. The fact that Spring Hill students reside in the Collegio Alma Mater Residence Hall offers a rich language immersion opportunity to practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. The majority of Friday’s will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets and galleries of Bologna.

Italian 201: Intermediate Italian

ITA 201 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to advance students in the Italian language. Aspects of teaching will entail: reading, analysis and class discussion of texts (articles, songs, short stories), oral presentations, based on research on the newspapers, writing homework assignments (compositions, essays, journal). This course is entirely conducted in Italian. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions and grammar sufficient to support these. The fact that Spring Hill students reside in the Collegio Alma Mater Residence Hall offers a rich language immersion opportunity to practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. Dedicated Fridays will include a cultural trip, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets and galleries of Bologna.

Italian 381: Advanced Italian

ITA 381 Syllabus

The primary goal of this course is to advance students in the Italian language. Aspects of teaching will entail: reading, analysis and class discussion of texts (articles, songs, short stories), oral presentations, based on research on the newspapers, writing homework assignments (compositions, essays, journal). This course is entirely conducted in Italian. Emphasis will be placed on developing speaking, listening – comprehension, reading and writing expressions and grammar sufficient to support these. The fact that Spring Hill students reside in the Collegio Alma Mater Residence Hall offers a rich language immersion opportunity to practice daily class lessons in one’s life in the residence hall. Dedicated Fridays will include cultural trips, allowing one to practice his/her language skills in the city while offering exposure to some of the hidden treasures, markets and galleries of Bologna.

Philosophy 214: Environmental Ethics

PHL 214 Syllabus

The course will examine the philosophical issues of environmental ethics and the following questions: The competing paradigms of environmental science; historical roots of the environmental predicament, animal rights, and the idea of a sustainable society. The semester begins with studying the “myths” of origin of humanity in ancient Greece (Prometheus) and in the biblical tradition (Genesis). Chronologically the material will proceed arriving at a late semester review of contemporary authors. The closing sessions will address recent developments with regards to its implications on the future of human nature.

Political Science / History 315: Understanding the Mediterranean

HIS/POL 315 Syllabus

The Mediterranean as a category has increasingly gained rhetorical currency in historical and political debates. It is often presented as the floodgate through which trickle organized crime, political corruption, illegal immigration, financial crisis, and more generally, the malaise of globalization. This approach calls, however, for an alternative analysis, centered upon the importance of this region in its historical developments, as well as its current strategic and geopolitical dimension.
The first half of the course begins by defining the Mediterranean as a region in and of itself, to contrast the framing of Mediterranean versus that of MENA and Europe through geographical and historical lenses. Decolonization of the region will then be discussed from both a historical and a political perspective. Extra focus will be provided on the Italian context, examining Italian colonialism in the Fascist era, its logic and its effects, visible even today. The second half of the course explores different recent debates concerning the Mediterranean region, focusing upon the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the economic crisis, the Arab Spring, the role of religion and institutions, as well as the process of democratization currently underway in many Mediterranean countries.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the history, politics and identities of the Mediterranean, thereby enhancing and enriching their academic experience at SHC Italy Center.

Political Science 375: Terrorism, Revolution & War

POL 375 Syllabus

A central theme in this course is to try to figure out the extent to which wars are the purposeful, rational pursuit of policy or the result of seemingly inexorably forces over which there is little control. The course will culminated with a tour to North Africa and will provide students with a firsthand account of the Tunisian Jasmine Revolution that took place in the Spring of 2011.

Social Science 395: Issues in Social Justice– Immigration and Globalization

SSC 395 Syllabus

Community Based Research and Service–Designed to acquaint students with the main human rights issues confronting Italy and Europe, the course focuses on the changing face of the Mediterranean as new immigrants groups are arriving at unprecedented numbers while fleeing dictatorships in the Arab world. The class will concentrate on how Italians, the media, the Italian government and the European Union are protecting (or failing to protect) immigrants and political asylum seekers fleeing from nations at war or on the verge of collapse. This course will bring students in direct contact with immigrants themselves. Students are required to conduct a minimum of 24 hours of community based research and service work in the community.

Theology 261: World Religions

THL 261 Syllabus

A study of religious faith as a central fact of history and world culture through a reflective interpretation of major historical and theological documents. The survey course is anchored in the literature of Christianity, Islam and Judaism.